Monday, September 29, 2014

Soon Kueh ( 笋粿 )


I was told that this soon kueh is a quite a popular snack in Singapore. I am not sure about this, i probably never eaten the real soon kueh but looking at it, it looks very much like the vegetable dumpling ( chai kueh ) that is more commonly found here . Their fillings are similar that is consists of turnip ( jicama ) , carrot, dried shrimps, mushrooms and from what i read, the traditional soon kueh consists of bamboo shoots, in chinese which they call " soon" ( 笋), hence the name. Unlike the normal vegetable dumplings which the dumplings are kinda pleated, these soon kueh appear like a half moon shape,with no pleats. woohoo! I'm hopeless with pleating so making this saves me the struggle to pleat. Also, its skin is not really translucent or transparent as compared to the chai kueh but more white in colour.


The process of making the dough is still a bit intimidating but luckily it wasnt too difficult to handle. Just spare some extra flour for dusting, it should be fine. For those of you who are very experienced in making dumplings, you can opt to use whatever method you find it easier to cut out the thin circles for each dumpling. For me , i have divided the dough into portions and roll each portion out flat and thin and use a bowl to cut out the circles. Usually i dont have much luck with making the skin, at times they will turn hard after they cool down  but I am happy with this as it still remains soft for several hours. The unfinished ones i have kept in the fridge.


Recipe ( makes 20 pieces )
Filling
400gms turnip, cut into shreds
1/2 a carrot, cut into shreds
50gm dried shrimps, coarsely chopped
2 shallots, chopped
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 tsp salt
5 tbsp water
bit of dark soya sauce

* you can add in mushrooms to the filling to enhance the taste.
Method
Heat up enough oil to saute the dried shrimps until fragrant and sizzled. Add in the chopped garlic and shallots and saute till aromatic. Add in the turnip and carrot. Fry and keep tossing it. Add in the salt and dark soya sauce and continue frying till the turnip turns soft. Fry on low medium heat . Add in the water and let cook for a while till the turnip becomes crunchy soft. Remove from heat and leave aside to cool.

For the Dough ( adapted from www.feasttotheworld.com )
250gm rice flour, plus extra for dusting
80gm tapioca flour
550ml boiling water
3tbsp oil

Method
In a large bowl, put the rice flour and the tapioca flour and mix them using a fork. Pour in the boiling water slowly and stir well with a wooden spoon until a dough is formed. Use your hands to knead the dough till smooth. Be cautious as the dough is hot. You can use a plastic glove if you want. Cover the dough in a pot and let rest for 10 mins.

Divide the dough into 3 or 4 portions . Work on one portion at a time and leave the rest portions covered in the pot. If the dough is sticky, dust a little flour on it. On a plastic sheet or floured surface, roll out the dough flat . Using a round cutter or a bowl ( i used a bowl, 4 " diameter ) ,  press and cut each out individual dough. Dust your hands with a little flour  for easier handling. Put some filling on the dough, fold over and seal by pressing the edges. Repeat the same steps for all the remaining dough. Put on a steamer that is lined with a baking paper or oiled and steam on high heat for about 12 minutes. Brush some oil once removed from steamer to prevent sticking. You can work on batches, while one batch is steaming you can work on the remaining dough portions.



I am submitting this post to Asian Food Fest ( Singapore ) hosted by Grace of Life Can Be Simple

29 comments:

  1. Aha, now I know the difference between Soon Kuih and Chai Kuih. One with bamboo shoots and one without. Thanks for the clarification, Lena. Loved the filling in your soon kuih.

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  2. Hi Lena, only my boy and I eat soon kuehs. So ... I'm lazy to make soon kuehs ... Your delicious soon kueh is just in time for me to grab 1 for tea break ^-^!

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  3. 这个是 hak ka kueh ? 嘻嘻嘻 。。。。。。 很好看。我很。。。很。。。很。。。想吃也。

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  4. Lena, you are spot on about the soon kueh being a favourite snack here. I love this for brekkie anytime or even during tea. It's extremely delicious. I love how your soon kueh looks, I'm sure it's all gone in no time :)

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  5. Lena, when I was small, I don't like this kueh. I think it is due to the vegetable hah..hah... But now I will sapu anytime with lots of chilli sauce!

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  6. gosh, i havent eaten soon kuey for eons... but u started my craving with your lovely plateful of kueys!

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  7. Wow... homemade soon kuih. I want some too. Hope you're having a lovely week ahead dear.
    Blessings, Kristy

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  8. I usually have this during the weekends for lunch.....lazy to cook! Oh....I didnt make it but bought it the kuih shop.... Taste good with lots of chilli sauce.

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  9. Hi Lena, Soon Kueh or Chai Kueh, I don't know the difference until now! Your soon kueh look so delicious!

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  10. I don't think these need pleats to be beautiful--and easier is better I think. They look delicious too!

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  11. Hi Lena , I had sometime similar to these and they was deliciously good , I will try these , thanks for the recipe . I am pinning ;-D

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  12. I love that soon-bamboo filling! They look very delicious, Lena.

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  13. It is getting more difficult to find the real "soon" (bamboo shoots) kueh in Sg as most of filled with buangkuang (turnips).

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  14. Hi Lena,

    I like the fact that your soon kueh can stay soft even after several hours of steaming. Great recipe!

    I love soon kueh but can't convince my husband and son to like soon kueh as much as I do and wonder if making my own will help to convince better :p

    Zoe

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  15. Oh Lena. I am not sure if I should cry when I saw your post. This is one of my favourites and it is already 9pm here. How to find soon kueh now!!!

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  16. this looks delicious and the filling sounds so flavorful. I love seeing what you come up with next! You are so inspiring girl

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  17. May I have some please, with the extra dark sweet sauce????

    These soon kuehs looked extremely delish Lena :D I haven't plucked up my guts to make these yet though... kekeke

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  18. Hi Lena, soon kueh is yummy but no idea where to get them in KL. Hoping to have 1-2 piece from you now :)

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  19. Hi Lena,
    This looks good! Especially if eaten with some chilli sauce, I could eat a few! Yum, yum!

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  20. Hi Lena, I love these yummy droolworthy dumplings. You did an amazing job making them so perfect...love the filling, as well! xo

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  21. I remembered my mom making these and the skin was too thick, I made my sons ate some and said they were delicious even though I knew they don't like them lol! Hmm...maybe I should try this and give some to my mom...looks soft and nice:D

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  22. They look like lovely Pierogis Lena. Of course they aren't but I know I could never make them because I stink when it comes to dumplings. I've been using won ton skins to "fake" it, lol...I like the filling in these though. I may have to try it, somehow, oh how I do not know, lol...You did a GREAT job!!!

    Thanks so much for sharing, Lena...

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  23. You taught me about something new today Lean. I've never heard of soon kueh but I think I'd like to get acquainted now!

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  24. These are amazing, I've always wanted to try making something like this.

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  25. I like your recipe.
    Nice Blog . thanks for share.
    Frozen Food Warehousing

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